Academic Catalog and Handbooks

2023-2024 Edition

English (ENGL)

ENGL 110  Introduction to Literature  (4 Credits)  
Course offered through Upward Bound summer program.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 111  Introduction to Narrative Practice  (4 Credits)  
Introduction to Narrative Practice develops creative-writing skills in service of students’ professional pursuits. Applying skills from creative-writing to their future careers allows students to develop their own imaginative lives, explore questions of identity, amplify underrepresented voices in their professional fields, and to develop programming utilizing creative-writing and close-reading to benefit their future colleagues, clients, and patients. This course employs community-based experiential learning to meaningfully connect narrative practices to systems change outside of the classroom.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 111A, ENGL 111B  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 111A  Intro Narrative Prac/Health  (4 Credits)  
Introduction to Narrative Practice develops creative-writing skills in service of students’ professional pursuits. Applying skills from creative-writing to their future careers allows students to develop their own imaginative lives, explore questions of identity, amplify underrepresented voices in their professional fields, and to develop programming utilizing creative-writing and close-reading to benefit their future colleagues, clients, and patients. This course employs community-based experiential learning to meaningfully connect narrative practices to systems change outside of the classroom. Intended for Health majors. Instructor Permission required.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 111, ENGL 111B  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 111B  Intro Narrative Prac/Bus  (4 Credits)  
Introduction to Narrative Practice develops creative-writing skills in service of students’ professional pursuits. Applying skills from creative-writing to their future careers allows students to develop their own imaginative lives, explore questions of identity, amplify underrepresented voices in their professional fields, and to develop programming utilizing creative-writing and close-reading to benefit their future colleagues, clients, and patients. This course employs community-based experiential learning to meaningfully connect narrative practices to systems change outside of the classroom. Intended for Business majors. Permission of instructor required.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 111, ENGL 111A  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 112  Introduction to Analytical and Rhetorical Writing  (4 Credits)  
Analytical reading, writing, and critical reasoning for a variety of rhetorical purposes, including argumentation (broadly conceived). Practice in developing ideas, insights, and claims through the use of both personal observation/experience and external texts and perspectives. From this workshop-oriented course, you should gain awareness of the composing processes of invention, drafting, and revision; the rhetorical concepts of audience and purpose, methods, for developing, organizing, and editing your writing; and strategies for reading and analyzing various texts.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 120B  Fiercely Funny Fiction  (4 Credits)  
Imagine spending a semester reading novels about war, violence, and family strife. Would you descend into a slough of hopelessness and suffering? Not in this course. We’ll read novels by writers who use the devices of humor to explore deeply serious matters. Consider, for example, Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, the novel whose title became the phrase for irresolvable, absurd, even deadly bureaucratic tangles. In Heller’s novel, a military pilot who fears danger and refuses to fly bombing missions is sane, so he must fly more missions; a pilot willing to fly dangerous bombing runs is insane and eligible for grounding: “All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions.” We’ll read short stories and novels that use black humor, satire, parody, and other modes of humor to evoke laughter and to provoke thought about social institutions, ethical norms, and everyday choices.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 120C  The Truth of Fiction  (4 Credits)  
"Literature was not born the day when a boy crying “wolf, wolf” come running out of the Neanderthal valley with a big gray wolf at his heels; literature was born on the day when a boy came crying “wolf, wolf” and there was no wolf behind him." Vladimir Nabokov In this course we explore how the ordinary stuff of life gets transformed into stories that delight us, anger us, inspire us, and spur us to action. What is gained in this process of transforming “fact” into “fiction”? We will read several novels and short stories and watch a few films to explore this central question. Focusing on the social and political functions of storytelling, we will examine the ways in which stories can reinforce, reinvent, or subvert the ways in which we understand our world.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 120D  Tragedy, Passion and Sacrifice  (4 Credits)  
Bloody murder, illicit sex, martyrdom, guts and gore: This course is a pleasure tour through some of the noisiest transgressions in the Western Literary Canon. After a brief grounding in the patricide and fratricide of Greek theatre, the Bible, and Shakespeare, we’ll see what shape these themes take in modern U.S. fiction. Expect Wise Guys and Men in Pink Suits. We’ll also consider, occasionally, what happens when women take these matters in hand. Not for weak stomachs.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Justice  
ENGL 120F  Monstrosity and Metamorphosis in Fiction  (4 Credits)  
Monsters are an integral part of our narrative experience, from childhood ghost stories to updated contemporary tales of vampires and zombies. We are fascinated with monsters, the creatures that are almost us but not quite, the creatures we might become. The word monster comes from the Latin monere, meaning "to show," "to warn, or "to remind" (Webster's Word Histories, 1989). This course will examine literary representations of the monstrous. We will ask: How do we conceive of the monster and the monstrous? What forms can the monstrous take? What is the relationship between monsters and desire? What does monstrosity teach us about narrative forms? And above all, what does the monster reveal or show us about ourselves, especially how we understand and construct individual and social identity?
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 120G  The Hero's Trek: An Expedition Through Literature  (4 Credits)  
Heroes are easy to find in REALLY good books, right? However, have you ever wondered what makes those heroes “heroic”? What makes heroic characters relatable and unreachable at the same time? Can villains be heroic? Can heroes be bad? Throughout your semester-long literary expedition, we’ll look at MANY types of heroic characters—some characters you might like and some you won’t; some you can relate to and some you can’t. We’ll begin our expedition by creating a literary guide and a literary roadmap in order to figure-out how to effectively identify heroic characters. As we navigate through myriad literary worlds, the following is a list of “heroes” we’ll likely bump-into (not in any particular order): Gilgamesh, Lisbeth Salander, Guinevere, Esther, Aragorn, Odysseus, Aeneas, Laura Ingalls, Beowulf, Harry Potter, Natty Bumpoo/Hawkeye, Wife of Bath, Dracula, Sherlock Holmes, Lucy Pevensie, Achilles, Katniss Everdene. Who knows, you might even encounter an Ironman or a Black Widow or a Rick Grimes or an Aladdin or a Xena along the way. Join us as we travel vast literary worlds in search of the sometimes elusive but always interesting literary hero.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Movement  
ENGL 120H  Detective Stories  (4 Credits)  
Starting with Sherlock Holmes, this class explores detective fiction. We will examine how writing about crime influences our understanding of good and evil and our ideas about justice. We will also consider how concepts of crime and justice have changed over time in detective fiction. Readings may include stories by Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), Agatha Christie, G. K. Chesterton, Ellis Peters, and Walter Mosley as well as other texts about crime and justice, including selections from the Rule of Benedict.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Justice  
ENGL 120I  Reading Science and Fiction: From the Known to the Unknown—and Back Again  (4 Credits)  
Imagine asking your Smart-device to continue reading Isaac Asimov's book "I, Robot." Imagine attending a history lecture on The Plague. Imagine listening to a speaker on catastrophic climate change and its impact on humans in North America. Imagine having a discussion with a psychology professor or colleague about changing gender roles and expectations. Imagine watching an anti-gravity football game with your teammates. The common link between these “imaginings” is this: Fiction helps discuss science AND science helps inform fiction. In this introduction to reading fiction course, students will have the opportunity to explore intersections between worlds of fiction and worlds of science by reading and discussing works by authors, thinkers, and scholars such as Leonardo DaVinci, George Orwell, HG Wells, Stephen Hawking, Sun Tzu, Marie Curie, Margaret Atwood, Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov (among others). Students will have opportunities to seek out places where new life might emerge, to explore strange new (and old) worlds, and to go boldly where they may not have gone before in their reading and collegiate experience.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Movement  
ENGL 120J  Modern Stories, Modern Life  (4 Credits)  
The goal of Modern Stories, Modern Life is to improve each student’s ability to read closely, think critically, write effectively and speak persuasively. Our primary means of doing this will be in reading and responding to a variety of works from contemporary American fiction and nonfiction. Students will learn to identify the basic elements of narrative so that they might move from, “I liked the story because it was about motorcycles and I like motorcycles,” to, “The writer’s use of setting contributed to the singleness of effect of the story by heightening the main character’s sense of isolation.” Along the way, we will encounter many of the fundamental issues of our day: love, loss, war, peace, the nature of civilization, the civilization of nature, and so on. Our material will be drawn from some of the most influential writers of our time such as George Saunders, ZZ Packer, Tim O’Brien, Jhumpa Lahiri, among others. During the course of the semester, students will complete several peer-edited, revised essays, as well as a variety of shorter, informal writing and speaking exercises. Daily class preparation will involve close readings of our text and crafting a question/comment or two as a possible discussion starter for the class. Much attention will also be devoted to the student’s own work through regular, peer-editing sessions and one-to-one writing conferences with the instructor.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 122A  Reading Fiction & Poetry: Myth, Fiction and Poetry  (4 Credits)  
In this course we will read fiction and poetry written by a variety of modern and contemporary authors who incorporate mythology and/or legends into their writing. As we begin each piece of fiction or poetry, we will simultaneously read versions of the myths or legends being accessed in the writing; in this way, we can see how the author may be re-imagining and translating the myth into his or her contemporary social, political, and artistic contexts. Students may expect to read writers from several different cultures and countries, to gain skills and confidence reading both poetry and fiction, and to explore the imaginative and critical dynamics of re-writing myth—both in our course readings and in multiple creative and critical writing exercises that we will undertake throughout the semester.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 122D  Literature: Men, Women and Aliens  (4 Credits)  
“Find me near the flower’s eye, that takes in provocation and begins to grow.”-Rumi. One definition of the word provoke is “to stir up intentionally.” In this class, we will examine literature that provokes readers. The literature we will encounter will provoke us in a variety of ways: from asking us to examine race and gender roles to asking us to question some firmly and commonly held beliefs, from asking us to enter into a poem that we might not understand to demanding that we jump into a narrative that will not let us go. The purpose of this class is to get stirred up by literature, to find ourselves breathless, angry, thrilled, confused, all within the confines of a page, so that we may, as Rumi suggests, begin to grow.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 122E  Atlas of a Difficult World  (4 Credits)  
I borrowed the title of this literature course from a long poem by Adrienne Rich, in which she asks whether poetry can help us find our way through the dangers that mark the world of the twenty-first century. Rich and many other writers have asked what value imaginative literature has in "a difficult world." Does it create a bridge to cross the abyss between the personal and the pub-lic, the aesthetic and the political, the I and the we? Should literature be such a bridge, or is this a misunderstanding and misuse of art? To address these questions, we will read the works of poets, fiction writers, memoirists, and theorists. You will add your voices to this conversation by doing many kinds of writing-a poetry anthology, a personal essay, and a critical/analytical essay. I will also give frequent short written assignments which will become the spring-boards into each day's discussion. I hope we will often find ourselves out beyond the known world, needing an atlas or at least a GPS. There will be a written mid-term exam and an oral final exam. I will ask you to present some of your work to the class, memorize and recite a poem, raise questions, bring your experience of the world to bear on what we read, help each other improve as writers, and be actively engaged in all course activities.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 122F  Modern Irish Literature  (4 Credits)  
This course will both hone and investigate our literary interpretive practices, focusing on some of the most inventive and influential literature to emerge from Ireland in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We’ll read both past masters and current practitioners of the literary arts (some in translation), including, W.B. Yates, Elizabeth Bowen, James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, Thomas Kinsella, Seamus Heaney, Evan Boland, Medbh McGuckian, Paul Muldoon, and Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill. We will pay particular attention to the way these and other writers imagine(d) their work in conversation with that of their peers, creating and complicating notions of cultural and artistic identity.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 122G  Literature: What's a Meta For?  (4 Credits)  
What does literature mean? So often, a story or a poem mean more than one thing at the same time: and what they are really all about can seem to elude us. In this course we read poems and stories that clearly mean two things at once. But when is a snake just a snake, and when is it Satan? By reading medieval to contemporary texts, we learn to decipher this form of “double-speaking” otherwise known as "allegory." The works we read for class will often be about shape-shifting characters (such as Pinocchio and Gregor Samsa), while all of the stories themselves will appear to shape-shift before our eyes as they start out about one thing and turn into another. By the end of the course, students attain the skills to read these transformations with confidence and delight. Coursework involves attentive reading, reflective and analytical writing, and rigorous participation in class discussions.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 123A  Poetry and Popular Music  (4 Credits)  
Poetry is an oral art. Traditionally, poetry has been spoken or chanted aloud and integrated with music, dance and ritual. Today, popular culture offers some interesting avenues for exploring the rhythmic, musical and ritualistic use of language in ways that could be considered poetic. The voice that emerged from ritual poetry is a voice of vision and prophecy. Beginning with The Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (often cited as the first album where the songs are integrated as a work of art), popular music began to do the work of ritual poetry. The visions of popular musicians, like those of poets, became important aspects in a culture's understanding of itself. This course will investigate popular culture manifestations of the visionary tradition in poetry.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 124A  Narrative Identities  (4 Credits)  
Women, men, and aliens. This sounds more like a reality tv show than a college class, but in fact, it is a popular culture course that offers students a way to explore their personal identities. Through the critical examination of novels, short stories, and movies, students will be asked to think about their own gendered, racial, and ethnic identities. This discussion-based class will also push students to examine the influence of society and culture on identity.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 124C  Nonfiction of Identity  (4 Credits)  
In this course we will read multiple modern essayists whose work explores ideas of cultural and social difference and identity in our contemporary American culture(s). Writers will include Claudia Rankine, Kao Kalia Yang, Kiese Laymon, and others.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 124D  Fiction of Identity  (4 Credits)  
Years ago, TV cop Joe Friday left a permanent imprint on our nation’s sensibility with his signature phrase, “Just the facts, Ma’am.” In other words, he was only interested in the truth, the details that really mattered, as he endeavored to solve a case, to figure things out. Fiction, on the other hand, is not dependent upon facts as we generally understand them. (You want talking pigs? Meet Wilbur or Snowball. Ten-year-old wizards? Hello, Harry Potter.) And yet, for those interested in Truth with a capital T, fiction is the best source for questions such as What is Love? Or Loss? How does a mountain FEEL? Who am I? In this course, students will read fiction – specifically short stories from contemporary masters like Jhumpa Lahiri, George Saunders, ZZ Packer, and Jamel Brinkley – in an effort to better understand concepts of gender, race and ethnicity, and culture.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 124E  Our Monsters, Our Selves  (4 Credits)  
Monsters are an integral part of our narrative experience, from childhood ghost stories to contemporary tales of vampires and zombies. We are fascinated with monsters, the creatures that are like us but not quite, the creatures we might become. This course will examine representations of the monstrous in a variety of genres in order to examine identity in the contemporary United States, with a particular focus on race, ethnicity, and gender. We will ask: How do we conceive of the monster and the monstrous? Who decides who (or what) is monstrous and why? And above all, what does the monster reveal or show us about ourselves, especially how we understand and construct individual and social identity?
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 124F  Detecting Identity  (4 Credits)  
American mystery stories take a hard look not only at the scene of the crime but also at society. By bringing individual lawbreaking to public view, the detective reveals the tension, hypocrisy, and corruption of the surrounding society. This class introduces you to the detective fiction genre. We will focus on how American crime fiction explores and critiques social identities, especially race, ethnicity, and gender. Readings will include a variety of contemporary detective fiction by writers such as Tony Hillerman, Walter Mosley, and Barbara Neely.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 124G  Border Crossings  (4 Credits)  
American news media is filled with stories surrounding current refugee crises, travel bans, and immigration debates. But what does it really mean for someone to cross the border into the United States? What narratives does literature and film provide for understanding the complex ways that border crossing affects human identity? This course explores stories about how people are transformed by crossing the United States border; and, how these changes relate directly to their gender, race, and ethnicity (and the way each of those may be perceived and valued in the United States). Through our reading, we will endeavor to better understand social constructions of gender, race, and ethnicity, and to what degree those identities may be assigned or chosen. We will foster awareness of how dominant group features such as whiteness, heterosexuality, and citizenship status interplay with intersectional aspects of identity in meaningful and transformative ways. Our work in the course will lead us to understand power dynamics surrounding the constructions and impositions of identity within United States culture.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: CSD: Identity (CI)  
ENGL 206  Creative Writing: Clinical Encounters I  (4 Credits)  
English 206 is a creative writing course for pre-health science majors. Students participate in a sustained clinical experience, delivering creative writing sessions to a clinical population, while developing their own writing lives. This course helps students increase their capacity for working with ambiguity (moral, creative and narrative), while helping them see “patients” as people who are not defined by their diseases. Additionally, this course helps future clinicians learn to communicate with precise imagery and metaphors, while revealing connections between the practice of medicine and the arts of poetry and fiction.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Artistic Expression (AE)  
ENGL 207  Creative Writing: Clinical Encounters II  (4 Credits)  
English 207 is a creative writing course for pre-health science majors. Students participate in a sustained clinical experience, delivering creative writing sessions to a clinical population, while developing their own writing lives. This course helps students increase their capacity for working with ambiguity (moral, creative and narrative), while helping them see “patients” as people who are not defined by their diseases. Additionally, this course helps future clinicians learn to communicate with precise imagery and metaphors, while revealing connections between the practice of medicine and the arts of poetry and fiction.
Prerequisites: ENGL 206  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 211  Creative Writing: Nonfiction  (4 Credits)  
Craft and practice of writing creative nonfiction. Students write original works of creative non-fiction, including forms such as memoir, personal essay, photographic essay, and literary journalism. Students closely examine published essays, and participate in peer-review workshops. This course prepares students for advanced writing courses at the 300 level. Attention to style, grammar, paragraph development, etc. Prerequisite: completion of First-year Seminar.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 211Z  
ENGL 213  Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry  (4 Credits)  
Craft and practice of writing short fiction and poetry. Students write original works of fiction and poetry, closely examine published short stories and poems, and participate in peer-review workshops. This course prepares students for advanced creative writing workshops at the 300 level. Consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for a specific description of each semester's offering.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Artistic Engagement (AR), Artistic Expression (AE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 214  Writing the Experience  (4 Credits)  
Training and experience in teaching poetry writing and fiction writing in local schools while developing a deeper engagement to poetry and fiction writing. Students will participate in writing workshops of peer work, closely examine published stories and poems, and co-teach creative-writing sessions to area youth.
Prerequisites: THEO 100 or INTG XXXG  
Attributes: Artistic Expression (AE)  
ENGL 217  Creative Inquiries  (4 Credits)  
Exploration and incorporation of research into creative and critical works of original writing. Students examine research as a part of the creative and critical processes of writing-in genres including poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students evaluate and experiment with approaches to research as well as ways of incorporating it into their writing. This course is an excellent preparation for an Honors Thesis in the humanities.
Prerequisites: English 217 is a Thematic Focus - Truth course. You must take INTG 100 or 205 prior to taking ENGL 217, a Thematic Focus Course. You must take a Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (CI) course prior to or at the same time as Thematic Focus Courses.   
Equivalent courses: ENGL 220  
Attributes: Artistic Expression (AE), Thematic Focus - Truth  
ENGL 220  Creative Inquiries  (4 Credits)  
Exploration and incorporation of research into creative and critical works of original writing. Students examine research as a part of the creative and critical processes of writing-in genres including poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students evaluate and experiment with approaches to research as well as ways of incorporating it into their writing. This course is an excellent preparation for an Honors Thesis in the humanities.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 217  
Attributes: Artistic Expression (AE), Thematic Focus - Truth  
ENGL 221B  Early Western Literature: Homer to Dante  (4 Credits)  
This early western literature course starts in the ancient world and travels to the medieval as we read foundational masterpieces of literature. We read the famous Greek poets Homer and Sappho, and the later Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. We see how Virgil changes Homer in his later version to fit with the values of the Roman Empire. (We also look at some contemporary poems to see how modern writers retell Ovid’s classical myths.) In the Medieval period we see how Dante and other Christian writers transform the ancient, “pagan” stories into Christianized versions. Students see how a story changes over time as each writer turns old material into something new—something suited to his or her present time and place. We also study gender and sexual norms in these often sexually troubling works, and we see how marginalized female writers, such as Sappho and Christine de Pizan, depict their sex in their own words while carving out a place for women within a masculine tradition. Students in this course may expect to learn ways of reading literary texts, how to conduct literary research and analysis, as well as how to recognize allusions in later literature—a strong basis for future literary study.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 221A, HONR 250M, HONR 250O  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Movement  
ENGL 221C  World Literature: Voltaire and Nabokov  (4 Credits)  
In this course we will read some Masterworks of Western literature and drama in translation from the Early Modern period to the present day.  Our reading list includes some very famous texts, and other equally fascinating reads that may be less familiar to you.  Our texts come from Europe, Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil and may include:  Voltaire’s Candide, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Machado de Assis’ The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Chekov’s Uncle Vanya, Kafka’s The Trial, Freud’s Civilization and its Discontents, Camus’ The Plague, De Beauvoir’s The Second Sex, Rulfo’s Pédro Páramo, García Márquez’ Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Lispector’s Hour of the Star, and Calvino’s If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: HONR 250Q  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 221D  Fictions of Empire  (4 Credits)  
“The world of imperialism came crashing through the walls of the nineteenth-century novel. Old conflicts were terminated, old boundaries were destroyed, old characters were banished. A new universe of fiction was set down in their place. A revolution in the novel was effected” Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism. This course will focus on literature (mostly novels) produced in response to the historical experience of Empire. We will look at the ways in which literature has enabled the Empire, justifying its “civilizing mission,” reinforcing racial stereotypes, and normalizing European superiority. We will also look at the ways in which literature has critiqued and opposed the ideologies of Empire, garnering support for anticolonial movements, and contributing to nationalist struggles. Finally, taking our cue from Raskin’s comment (quoted above), we will investigate whether the operations of today’s Empire (some call it globalization) have generated another “new universe of fiction.”
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Movement  
ENGL 221F  Medieval Literature  (4 Credits)  
This course explores the earliest stories written in English. Funny, brutal, and mesmerizing, these tales from the medieval period--spanning 1,000 years—seem strange and yet oddly familiar. We'll divide the course into three sections, early, middle, and late medieval, reading foundational texts from each era, such as the extraordinary Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Canterbury Tales, and The Dream Vision of Piers Plowman. While we approach each text historically, we remain mindful of how medieval works exist in dialogue with literature from across the world and with later literature even into our present day. Students further enhance their study of manuscript culture and early literary production through hands-on visits to our HMML library and Book Arts Studio.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 222A  Literature of English Renaissance  (4 Credits)  
From 1580's to the 1680's England experienced an unprecedented literary renaissance, as writers resurrected and re-imagined classical literary forms to fit new cultural, political, and social pressures. We'll read and consider texts within this historical content, from the sonnet sequences of Lady Mary Wroth and Sir Philip Sidney, to epics such as Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene and John Milton's Paradise Lost, pastoral and country house poems by Aemilia Lanyer, Ben Johnson, and Andrew Marvell, the religious lyrics of John Donne and George Herbert, the occasional verse of Mary Herbert and Katherine Philips, and the Restoration era work of John Wilmot (the Earl of Rochester) and Aphra Behn.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 222C  Shakespeare's Inheritance  (4 Credits)  
New productions of early English drama show their wonderful liveliness, bawdiness, and spectacle. Alfred Hickling, writing for the UK newspaper, The Guardian, reported on August 7, 2012, about preparations for a cycle of plays tracing biblical stories from the creation to the Last Judgment: There are some bizarre items on the agenda of today’s production meeting at York Theatre Royal. Topics include "dinosaur topiary" and Pontius Pilate's underwear, while the wardrobe supervisor is anxious to know God's measurements. “Ineffable and Unknowable," someone suggests. "Very funny," comes the reply. "But I've got nearly 1,000 costumes to make and I need his inside leg." No wonder theater companies are eager to produce these plays; roisterous devils*, ranting tyrants, mischievous thieves-and great biblical heroes squabbling with their wives - enliven the scenes of biblical stories. We'll begin with excerpts from these cycles and move on to "morality plays" that figure Mankind beset not by devils but by personified Vices, tricky, and sly and smart and subtle. Shakespeare inherited the dramatic legacy of these earlier forms, and we’ll investigate the ways in which he uses and adapts them in his own dramatic works. After reading a sequence of medieval and early renaissance plays, we'll pay particular attention to the device of the play within the play, first in a work by Thomas Kyd, Shakespeare's contemporary, called The Spanish Tragedy, and then in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Hamlet (and perhaps Love's Labours Lost). As we move through the plays, we'll investigate the performance practices of Medieval and early modern drama in England. We'll look at documents and visual images – printed woodblock images, paintings, etc.-that will illuminate these practices before and during Shakespeare's time. By the time we complete the course, we may want to sign up for the York Theatre Royal's next production of early English drama.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Justice  
ENGL 222D  Shocking Discoveries: Literature and Science in 19th-Century Britain  (4 Credits)  
Excavations of dinosaurs, experiments with electrical currents, and theories of human origins charged the scientific, literary, and popular imagination in the 19th-century Britain. In this course, we’ll explore the dynamic relationship between scientific and literary writing in 19th-century Britian. We’ll read fiction and poetry by writers who see human lives and relationships through the lens of scientific discoveries.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 223C  Revolutionary Americas  (4 Credits)  
This course offers you a fresh perspective on the American Revolution—through the eyes of women as well as men, ordinary people as well as founding fathers, and enslaved as well as free Americans. We will examine how ideas about race, masculinity, and femininity shape concepts of liberty from the late eighteenth-century Atlantic revolutions to the US Civil War. Our discussions will focus on the messy and incomplete processes of social and personal transformation using a wide range of readings that trace experiences of escape and failure in early America, including Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography, the novel Charlotte Temple, and Mary Prince’s freedom narrative.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Justice  
ENGL 223D  Haunted Americas  (4 Credits)  
This course introduces you to the literary culture of the nineteenth-century Americas by introducing you to its ghosts. Literary forms, like the poetic elegy, cultural movements, such as gothicism and romanticism, and new technologies, like the photograph, combined to make the Americas very ghostly places in the 1800s. The course will feature works by and about three of the most significant groups of ghostly Americans: Native Americans, enslaved Americans, and women. We will consider theoretical approaches to haunting from psychological, sociological, historical, and literary perspectives and the historical contexts of imperialism and war that contributed to the haunting of the Americas. Readings for this class may include short stories, poems, and narratives by writers including Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, and Henry James.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Justice  
ENGL 223E  American Outsiders: American Literature 1945 - present  (4 Credits)  
In this course we will consider the role of the outsider (socially, politically, culturally, ethnically, aesthetically, and more) in the literature of the Americas from World War II to the present. The outsider has long figured in American literature, an oft celebrated figure, such as Henry David Thoreau writing alone in his cabin at Walden Pond. In this class we will study writers and artists who have chosen to work outside expected norms and others who have not had the choice, whose outsider status is determined by the dominant culture. We will carefully read poetry, drama, fiction, cultural criticism, and nonfiction to understand: What does it mean to be an outsider? Who decides who belongs and who does not? How does the literature and art-making of this period demonstrate how individuals and groups agitate for belonging, create new communities of belonging, and/or challenge artistic and social norms? Authors and artists may include: James Baldwin, Flannery O’Connor, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni Morrison, Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros, Junot Diaz, Claudia Rankine, John Cage, the Beat Poets, the Guerilla Girls, Kathy Acker, and more.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2-Movement  
ENGL 271  Individual Learning Project  (1-4 Credits)  
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 279A  Literary Theory and Criticism  (4 Credits)  
Introduction to literary and cultural theory. Students apply theoretical texts or concepts to literary or cultural texts (e.g., novels, films, television, popular arts, clothing, architecture, and public spaces).
Prerequisites: You must take INTG 100 or 205 prior to taking ENGL 279A, a Thematic Focus Course. You must take a Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (CI) course prior to or at the same time as Thematic Focus Courses.   
Equivalent courses: ENGL 243  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Focus - Truth  
ENGL 280A  Creative Writing: Italy  (4 Credits)  
On this May term, CSBSJU students travel to Pavia, Italy for an intercultural writing workshop to develop writing skills and intercultural competencies. While living in a beautiful and historical residential college, CSBSJU students take this course together with English-speaking students at the University of Pavia. Our creative writing course centers on writing exercises and workshops within a larger thematic framework: the ethics of creative writing. What ethical crises—moral, political, ecological—do American and Italian poets write about? What concerns do our cultures share and in what ways might we approach the same concerns differently? Through our reading of selected contemporary poets, we examine similarities and differences in perspectives we have on some of the challenges we share as humans in the modern age. Through generous support from the CSB Literary Arts Institute, the course incorporates a visiting Italian writer who meets with our class to discuss writing and to host us for a tour of Pavia to discuss its literary past and relationship to the writer’s own work. Students workshop together in small groups to help one another negotiate a foreign language (reading a few poems in English and a few in Italian); undertake creative writing exercises; and discuss one another’s work in a context the promotes intercultural writing and communication skills. Each student is supported in developing a writing portfolio in which they explore their own concerns in their own words.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: COLG 280K  
Attributes: Global Engagement (GL)  
ENGL 286  Introduction to Film Studies  (4 Credits)  
Introduction to film as a medium of communication and representation. Possible topics include but are not limited to a survey of the development of film and the movie business, techniques of acting, directing, cinematography, narrative style, and film theory. The vocabulary of cinema and representative films of the first hundred years of filmmaking is covered. Recent titles have included "An Introductory Guide to Active Spectatorship" and "Introduction to Film Techniques, Meanings, and Pleasures."
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: COMM 286  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter1/2 - Truth  
ENGL 311  Creative Nonfiction  (4 Credits)  
Theory and practice of writing longer nonfiction forms (essays, articles) dealing with complex subject matter. This course explores the rhetorical strategies used in non-technical writing drawn from a variety of disciplines. Students focus on the development of their own voices and styles.
Prerequisites: You must take INTG 100 or 205 prior to taking ENGL 311, a Thematic Focus Course. You must take a Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (CI) course prior to or at the same time as Thematic Focus Courses.   
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior, Sophomore or Senior.   
Attributes: Artistic Engagement (AR), Artistic Expression (AE), Thematic Focus - Truth  
ENGL 313  Advanced Creative Writing  (4 Credits)  
Advanced creative writing workshop in poetry or fiction. This course alternates its topic semester to semester to offer students opportunity to take advanced workshops in more than one genre of creative writing Consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for a specific description of each semester's offering.
Prerequisites: ENGL 213  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Artistic Engagement (AR)  
ENGL 313A  Advanced Poetry Workshop  (4 Credits)  
Are you secretly a poet? Do you love to write? This course offers a careful study the art of poetry and the writing life. Together, we read a wide variety of styles and forms of poetry as we write original poetry throughout the semester. Students may expect readings and writing exercises to supplement their study and to stretch their writing. Regular writing workshops will provide sustained feedback on student writing, as well as exercise in reading and editing skills. As part of the course each student will read the major works of an individual poet in a guided study of that author’s achievements, and each student will produce a revised portfolio of creative work, meet with visiting writers, and participate in a poetry reading. The course primarily aims to develop creative writing skills and to help students grow as writers; additionally though, the course enhances students’ ability to read and discuss poetry, provides practice revising and editing written work, and expands students’ knowledge of poets writing in English.
Prerequisites: ENGL 213  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Artistic Engagement (AR)  
ENGL 313B  Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction  (4 Credits)  
In this semester of Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction, we will delve deeply into reading and writing fiction with even greater attention to language, voice, and form. You will explore and better understand the practice of your own fiction writing, as well as study and attempt together to understand why a particular story works in a particular way. What makes this character engaging? Why does dialogue in this piece leap off the page while in another story the dialogue feels static? We will also expand our expectations of narrative and narrative conventions, while asking what makes a good story. You will strive to, as Lidia Yuknavitch writes in The Chronology of Water, “Make up stories until you find one you can live with. Make up stories as if life depended on it.” Workshop will be an essential component of the class. We will also perform writing exercises based on the readings, experiment with our texts, and work to stay present in the world and in the word.
Prerequisites: ENGL 213  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Artistic Engagement (AR)  
ENGL 315B  Editing and Publishing  (4 Credits)  
With literary publishing in rapid flux, book publishers knit their brows and try to forecast demand for printed books and e-books. Every prediction prompts a new round of hand-wringing about the future of the book. The shift from print to electronic formats has had—and continues to have—enormous consequences for the publishing industry. Claims that this shift spells the death of books, however, demand careful examination. In English 315, we’ll explore the rapidly changing book-publishing industry, looking closely at the ways in which industry developments and new technologies affect writers, readers, and publishing companies. We’ll begin by studying the traditional book-publishing model, and then we’ll study the effects of digital technologies on the transmission of writers’ works to audiences of readers. By the end of the semester, we may not arrive at certain answers about the future of literary publishing, but we’ll understand many of the forces that will shape that future.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 315C  Environmental Writing  (4 Credits)  
This course offers students the opportunity to study and practice the art of creative writing – both fiction and nonfiction genres – within the context of the natural world. Students will read and critique a variety of already published work by some of the contemporary masters of the form. Students will also have frequent opportunities to read and discuss drafts from other members of the class, using an adapted writing workshop format, as well as regular, one-to-one meetings with the instructor. Ultimately, and most importantly, students will create their own versions of how written language can be used to express and interpret the relationship between humans and nature. A pair of in-class, semi-formal readings will complete the Nature Writing experience.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior, Sophomore or Senior.   
Equivalent courses: ENVR 300P  
ENGL 317  Writing in Business  (4 Credits)  
Successfully navigating a business is tricky business; however, with planning, research, and execution, it is not an impossible task. This class is structured to give the student practice writing and communicating in four types of business climates: government, for-profit, non-profit, and education. This “practice” includes resumes, cover letters, formal reports, professional presentations, grant proposals, advertising copy for TV and radio, communications for emerging social media outlets, business plans, formal and informal memos, various forms of print media, etc. In the process, students will have opportunities to consider various career options and look ahead to professional life after college. In addition to the academic work in the classroom, students will hear from a number of business professionals as those professionals will come to class to share their collective wisdom about writing and communicating in the business environment. All in all, this class will help students realize that the theory and “book-learnin’” they experience in the academic arena really do have practical applications and a place in the world outside of academia.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Equivalent courses: ENGL 315A  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Writing Requirement (WR)  
ENGL 340A  Medieval Quests  (4 Credits)  
In Arthurian Romances and medieval epics, the heroic knight commonly encounters dangerous folk and creatures that pose threats to his life and virtue. These monstrous figures threaten the knight with violence and with the allure of their otherworldly difference. Yet these monsters also reflect fears and attitudes about historical “Others” such as women, the Islamic East, Judaism, and the Orient. In this course we will examine these encounters with an eye to cultural anxieties surrounding difference. To better understand these anxieties, we will read and discuss the history and culture of the Middle Ages in relationship to our primary texts: Le Morte D’Arthur; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; The Romances of Chrétien de Troyes; The Lais of Marie De France; Tristan and Isolde; and The Song of Roland. Reading critical texts such as Said’s Orientalism and Frye’s The Secular Scripture, we will explore the “line between ‘the West’ and ‘the Other’,” the quest as nightmare, the uncanny, and fears surrounding mixed blood. (If you are a fan of Game of Thrones, dragons, Lancelot and Guinevere, or medieval mystics, you’ll be among your people).
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 340B  Jane Austen & Charles Dickens: Social Criticism  (4 Credits)  
Jane Austen’s heroines serve as vehicles and as targets for satire of social conventions, especially the conventions surrounding money, marriage, and manners. In the first half of this course, we’ll examine Austen’s keenly ironic novels. In the second half of the course, we’ll turn our attention to Charles Dickens’ novels, examining his powerful critiques of Victorian family situations and social institutions.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 348B  James and Wharton: Marriage and the Market  (4 Credits)  
In this course, we will look at American novels that feature heroines facing the complications of marriage at a moment when national conversations about women’s education, their increasing independence, the relationship between difference and equality, and the limits of contract law take place in the context of a rapidly developing market for commodity exchange. Focusing heavily on Henry James—The Portrait of a Lady (1880) and The Ambassadors (1903)—and Edith Wharton—The House of Mirth (1905) and The Custom of the Country (1913)—we will meet some of American literature’s more sympathetic adulteresses as well as its most infamous single marriageable females. We will also test these characterizations against their limits in terms of the working class and immigrants with the novels of Theodore Dreiser—Sister Carrie (1900) and An American Tragedy (1925)—and Anzia Yezierska.—Arrogant Beggar (1927). (This reading list is subject to revision.).
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 351  Chaucer  (4 Credits)  
Geoffrey Chaucer, legendary author of The Canterbury Tales, is considered to be the “father” of English Literature, English Poetry, and even the English Language. But who was he, and why is he important to us? This course explores Chaucer’s life and writing, examining the paradoxes and mysteries that surround his identity: what is known about his contemporaries, social networks, and political intrigues. We discover Chaucer writes about concerns pressing in the medieval period that remain relevant today: marriage; sex; political corruption and tyranny; Christianity and Islam; the mistreatment of women; anti-Semitism; refugees; loss; and the human longing for consolation. We read and listen to his writings in Middle English so we can appreciate the humor, beauty, and brilliance of his verse. We tour the genres that Chaucer incorporates into his Tales—including the fabliau (bawdy tale), saint’s lives, beast tales, and romances—both to deepen our understanding of medieval literature and to gain a clearer view of Chaucer’s innovations. The course also examines manuscript culture (looking at how his poems were first collected) as well as the most recent commentaries on his work, such as “Chaucer at Ground Zero,” to understand why his writing still matters now. In-class discussions and readings will support student learning throughout the course, and students will receive individual guidance in a critical and/or creative research project designed around their interests.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 352  Shakespeare  (4 Credits)  
This course will focus on reading closely, discussing, and writing about key representative plays from Shakespeare’s career. We’ll consider how his work both contributed to, and moved past, the conventions of Elizabethan and Jacobean theatrical genres. We will move in a roughly chronological order, in order to consider the trajectory of the plays as well as historical and cultural shifts. Plays will likely include The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry IV Part One, As You Like It, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Winter’s Tale.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 355  Studies in Individual Authors  (2,4 Credits)  
Study of several works by one or two authors. Recent offerings include "William Faulkner/Toni Morrison."
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 365  Current Issues in Literary Studies  (4 Credits)  
Analysis and discussion of significant literary texts. Students will complete a substantial research project designed to facilitate the transition or studying beyond the undergraduate English degree. Thematic focus of the course varies with instructor.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior.   
ENGL 365A  Capstone: Reading Across Genres  (4 Credits)  
This course offers a culminating opportunity for English majors to synthesize their college work, especially much of what they have learned in their English courses. The English Department has established this course to bring English majors into contact with each other over a semester to read, reflect, and write about a common reading list. Students in this course will gain a heightened awareness of the history, content and theoretical approaches to the discipline of English, will develop a substantial understanding of their major within a larger context of its discipline, and will come to know well their immediate community of majors. “Capstone” is organized around a reading list entitled “Books Every English Major Should Read.” Because this course is a requirement of the English Department, it will be taught by different faculty members and each faculty member will have a different reading list. My list will include novels, short stories, poetry, film, and works of Critical or Cultural Theory. Each category will be represented by selected works that “every English major should” know. The major texts for the course will be chosen from the categories listed above. Our texts will include: Ernest Hemingway, J. D. Salinger (short stories); W. B. Yeats, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, Gary Snyder (poetry and poetic essay); Haruki Murakami (contemporary novel TBA), and Walter Benjamin (theoretical essay). One or two other texts, including film, will be chosen at a later date in consultation with the class. I will provide a list of further reading suggestions. These suggestions will serve as souvenirs of the CSBSJU English major and may be read at any time in the future!
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior.   
ENGL 365B  Capstone: Milton  (4 Credits)  
As a poet and essayist, Milton has had a tremendous impact on the arts, politics and culture of succeeding generations. From the writing of American revolutionaries such as Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, to the poetry of William Blake and William Wordsworth, and to Philip Pullman’s recent trilogy of novels—His Dark Materials—Milton has provided a template for thinking about innocence, knowledge, sex, liberty of thought, and humankind’s relationship to God. In this course we will read all of the major poems, from early masterworks such as “Lycidas,” and Comus, to the epic Paradise Lost, and the late mini-epics: Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes. Prose works may include the famous defense of the liberty of the press—Areopagitica—as well as excerpts from his wildly (even dangerously) controversial The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, and The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates. We will consider these works in the context of Milton’s desire to become an English Vergil, his role as a republican supporter in the English Civil War, his justifications for the execution of King Charles I, his work for the interregnum government of Oliver Cromwell, and his final, extraordinarily productive years as a blind poet who only barely escaped execution under the Restoration of King Charles II. By the end of the semester we will hope to have a rich understanding of the work and life of one of England’s most famous and influential poets.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior.   
ENGL 365C  Capstone: Race & the American Imaginary  (4 Credits)  
What can we make of the stubborn New World habit of giving symbolic power to black populations while simultaneously denying them real social power? Why are whites so often comfortable “at play” in black cultural forms? Our primary texts will be novels from the U.S. and Argentina, mostly from the second half of the 19th Century; we will also consider other fine arts forms such as minstrelsy, classical music, jazz, painting, and photography, as well as writings from Economics, New Musicology, Literary Theory, and Cultural Studies. Since this is a seminar, students will take central responsibility for their learning: expect a vigorous reading load, a substantive seminar presentation, and a research paper. We begin with Eric Lott’s Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class. Novels may include: Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn (1884), James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912), and William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! (1936). Music may include works of Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Scott Joplin, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, The American Songbook, and Charlie Parker.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior.   
ENGL 365D  Writing Difference  (4 Credits)  
Readers of Medieval European literature often encounter strange figures: demonized Saracens and non-Christian others, hybrid creatures, and monstrous, supernatural women. Who or what is being Othered in these representations? On whose authority are African people represented as half-animal? Or Muslims as demonic? Our course examines the creation of ‘outsiders’ in the Middle Ages and how medieval writers constructed difference. Topics of inquiry include: Othering of Saracens and non-Christians; Muslim-Christian Dialogues, Estranging the Feminine, Labyrinths, and Hybrid Creatures: Myth, Monsters, and the Imagination. #winteriscoming As part of this highly active course, our group visits HMML to learn about interfaith dialogue and co-existence in Middle Eastern manuscripts; we examine the Othering of women in scientific as well as literary treatises, as well as important responses to this Othering in the works of female Christian mystics and secular writers such as Christine de Pizan; and, we uncover hybridity as an image of difference: mythical creatures abound in medieval texts, romances in particular but also in epic poems and in sea-monster laden cartography. Writing projects throughout the semester focus on integrating research meaningfully into creative writing as well as literary and historical analyses.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a class of Junior or Senior.   
ENGL 366  Studies in Modern Literature  (4 Credits)  
Modernism and modern literature is often characterized by questions of identity, fragmentation, alienation, and the challenging of old forms. The modernist era is sometimes narrowly defined as the years between WWI and WWII; however, the thematic and formal considerations surfaced earlier, and resonated far later. Course readings will include a selection of fiction and/or poetry written in the late 19th to mid-20th centuries.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 366A  The Lost Generation: Literature between the World Wars  (4 Credits)  
The term “Lost Generation” refers to those who came of age during World War I and helps describe the upheaval and loss experienced by an entire generation for whom the world had changed forever. This course focuses on American and British writers working in the period between the world wars, a period known as literary modernism. In the face of world war, a global pandemic, and more, these writers were breaking away from past models of writing and challenging social and political norms. You will read carefully, write argumentative literary analyses, and conduct scholarly research. Readings by such authors as Virginia Woolf, Jean Toomer, T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Zora Neale Hurston, Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Nella Larsen, and others.
Prerequisites: Before taking a Cultural and Social Difference: Systems Courses (CS) you first must complete the following Integrations requirements; Learning Foundations (LF), Theological Encounter (TE), and Cultural and Social Difference: identity (CI).   
Attributes: CSD: Systems (CS), Writing Requirement (WR)  
ENGL 367  Studies in Contemporary Literature  (4 Credits)  
A selection of fiction, poetry and/or other forms written in the past 30-50 years. Recent courses have emphasized emerging forms, including graphic novels, hybrid works, and online works. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 368  Creative Writing: Capstone  (4 Credits)  
Practice and refinement of creative writing in a chosen genre. Students explore their creative writing practice through a deeper engagement with the literary arts, including analysis of genre and form, discussion of significant texts and writers, and a sustained writing project culminating in a portfolio of original creative work. This class prepares students for writing beyond undergraduate studies. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 369  Studies in Critical Theory  (4 Credits)  
Study of selected critical theories and application, using such approaches. Recent course offerings have included "Globalization and American Literature." Recommended for majors planning for graduate English studies. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 370  SCSU/SABRO COURSES  (1-6 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 370CA  Tell the Tale: Latin American Literature  (4 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 42  
ENGL 370CB  The Fabled Last Place: Travel Writing in Latin America  (4 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 42  
ENGL 370DA  LIT MODERN WORLD-DUBLIN(HM,HE)  (4 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 60  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370FA  French Writers: Transformations in French & Francophone Society from 1945 to the Present  (3 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 52  
Attributes: Artistic Expression (AE)  
ENGL 370LA  HARRY POTTER (HM,HE) LOND  (4 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 43  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370LB  The Nature of Story: Creative Writing  (4 Credits)  
Do you fancy yourself a novelist or a writer of short stories? Not sure how do you develop your main characters? How should you structure the plot? What point of view should you choose? The focus of this course will be decidedly practical as students learn to read as writers, gleaning tips on the craft. Students will consider the processes of writing, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential issues. London’s own vibrant arts scene and literary traditions form a fascinating focus and locus for the study of creative writing. Class members will engage with local novelists, poets and playwrights through guest lectures and readings.
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 43  
ENGL 370LC  Literary London: Reading the Restless City - Abroad  (4 Credits)  
Is London fairly represented in literature? Has the way London is presented changed over time? Is there a difference in the London of a novel and the London of a travel guide? London is a city of stories and has been an inspiration and subject for writers over hundreds of years. This course introduces students to London, both as an object of enquiry and as source, setting, and inspiration for numerous literary texts. Exploring the places, tropes, symbols, and characters in a selection of texts enables students to think about the city in relation to key theoretical and historical/cultural events that have helped shape the way we each experience London. Different approaches to ‘writing and reading’ London are addressed alongside an analysis of the ways in which the city acts as a basis for critical interrogation and understanding.
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 43  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370LD  Shakespeare - Abroad  (4 Credits)  
You’re undoubtedly familiar with William Shakespeare, but how did he and other Elizabethan wordsmiths define an era and create a timepiece of this dramatic time with their works? How are Elizabethan values and stereotypes portrayed within the works of the age’s most celebrated poets, authors and playwrights? What was it like to enjoy live Elizabethan theatre? Students taking this course will be introduced to the life and work of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries through lectures, workshops, field trips and theatre visits.
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 43  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370LE  Travel Writing  (4 Credits)  
What is travelling and what does it mean to each of us. What is it for? Why do we travel, and how do we decide where to go? What is travel writing? What do we want from it? Do you feel more ‘American’ now you’re out of America (if that's where you're from)? Why and How? As Tim Cahill, the legendary travel writer and former editor of 'Outside Magazine', once wrote, “It isn’t the travelling, it’s the writing.” Cahill, Andrew Bain, Rory MacLean, Sara Wheeler, Rolf Potts, Bill Bryson–these are writers with wildly different styles, and many of them travel to completely mundane locations, but they all manage to learn something about themselves, and why they travel, in the process of writing. In other words, it’s not where they go; it’s how they experience the place, and how they write about that experience.
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 43  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370OA  Comparative South African Literature  (4 Credits)  
This course will focus on excellent, representative works in South African literature:  English literature by white and black writers, Afrikaans literature in translation, and literature written by both men and women from diverse cultures and races. The main focus is to give a profile of the best of South African literature and to highlight current literary debates against the relevant socio-historical and political context.
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 64  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370PA  Nobel Prizes in Spanish and Latin American Literature: A Critical Approach  (3 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 67  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 370SA  LIT/HIST 20 CEN EUROPE (HM,HE)  (3 Credits)  
Prerequisites: None  
Corequisites: XXXX 61  
ENGL 371  Individual Learning Project  (1-4 Credits)  
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.
Prerequisites: None  
ENGL 379A  American Deception: Frauds, Cons, and Social Climbers  (4 Credits)  
Here’s the truth: fake news wasn’t invented in the run-up to the 2016 American presidential election. This course uses nineteenth-century fiction to explore the United States’ love-hate relationship with fakes, frauds, and cons. On the one hand, the American Dream of social mobility seems to always entail a little bit of “fake it ‘till you make it.” Some class climbers and tricksters who deceive their way to success, like Benjamin Franklin, are our cultural heroes. On the other hand, writers have explored how deception and hypocrisy threaten democratic social order and the possibility of faith in something larger than our selves. This class explores how nineteenth-century American literature examined both its own practices of deception and those of the culture around it. Readings may include Native trickster stories and works by Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Fanny Fern, Anna Cora Mowatt, and Charles Chesnutt. Students in this class can expect to gain a better understanding of the historical context for contemporary debates over authenticity in media. We will also debate the role of self-invention in religion, race, gender, and capitalist democracy in America. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Focus - Truth, Writing Requirement (WR)  
ENGL 381  Literature by Women  (4 Credits)  
Selection of works written by women. Recent course offerings include "Literature by Women: African, Asian, and Caribbean." Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Equivalent courses: GEND 360N  
ENGL 382  Race and Ethnicity in American Literature  (4 Credits)  
This class undertakes advanced exploration of how literary works represent, construct, and evolve to respond to race and ethnicity in the Americas. We will examine how constructions of race and ethnicity in literary works intersect with similar constructions of gender, sexuality, or class, and how these constructions vary across time, cultures, and societies. Coursework will critically analyze the way that these forms of identity dynamically connect to systems of power and raise questions of justice. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: Before taking a Cultrual and Social Difference: Systems Courses (CS) you first must complete the following Integrations requirements; Learning Foundations (LF), Theological Encounter (TE), and Cultural and Social Difference: identity (CI).   
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: CSD: Systems (CS)  
ENGL 383  Post-Colonial Literature  (4 Credits)  
A study of literature, partly in translation, from African, Asian and the Caribbean countries. The course examines the specific historical and cultural contexts in which these literatures arise. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: Before taking a Cultural and Social Difference: Systems Courses (CS) you first must complete the following Integrations requirements; Learning Foundations (LF), Theological Encounter (TE), and Cultural and Social Difference: identity (CI).   
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: CSD: Systems (CS)  
ENGL 384  American Environmental Literature  (4 Credits)  
This course explores the long history of American writing about nature and the environment, with particular attention to questions of the human place in nature. Some of this literate is about exploration—what is out there? Some of this is about the utility of nature—what can we do with vast forests, grasslands, or rivers? But the most interesting examples are often about what we can learn from nature and what obligations we may have to non-human life—what is our place in nature? The styles and traditions of American nature/ environmental writing have changed dramatically over time and today are quite diverse, incorporating at times elements of philosophy, theology, ethics, science, economics, politics, and art. Through reading, thinking, and discussing, and writing critically about a wide range of examples from genre students will gain an appreciation for the depth of the American literary approach to nature, become familiar with many of the writers and texts that could be said to form a “canon” in the field. And will learn to actively engage such writing form a variety of approaches including historical analysis, ecocriticism, and ethical reasoning.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 385L, ENVR 315  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter3 - Justice  
ENGL 385C  Literature of South Asia  (4 Credits)  
There has been a consistent strain in Western ideology, which has defined the East as absolutely Other. Whether it is judged to be execrable or laudable, India, China, Japan, and other countries in the area have been seen as mystical, inscrutable lands where even the most ordinary actions [are] imbued with symbolism. --Patrick Colm Hogan, “Beauty, Politics, and Cultural Otherness: The Bias of Literary Difference” This course is an attempt to recover the Indian subcontinent from a persistent tendency in the Western media to cast the land as “mysterious” or “mystical” and its people as “spiritual” or “exotic.” Our readings of literary texts from India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, will reveal the concerns expressed by the writers of these countries—concerns that are rooted in and shaped by the material and historical world they inhabit. This course is not an introduction to the “culture” of the Indian subcontinent, but an attempt to understand the complex relationship between cultural production (literature) and what Terry Eagle-ton calls “its enabling material conditions” (“Introduction,” Marxist Literary Theory). We might indeed encounter veiled women and snake charmers—perhaps even elephants—in our readings, not as symbols of an unknowable, exotic East, but as representations of certain forms of social consciousness. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 385E  South African Literature-Comparative Focus  (4 Credits)  
This course will focus on excellent, representative works in South African literature: English by white and black writers, Afrikaans literature in translation, written by men and women from diverse cultures and races. The main focus is to give a profile of the best of South African literature and to highlight current literary debates against the relevant socio-historical and political context. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 385H  Comic Novels and Social Class  (4 Credits)  
The tradition of the comic novel begins properly with Henry Fielding. In this course, we’ll read Joseph Andrews and Shamela, looking at Fielding’s use of humor to explore issues of class and morality. Then we’ll move on to the Smollett’s Humphry Clinker, an epistolary novel that satirizes the absurdities of the human body and the social order. We’ll also read Lawrence Sterne’s incomparable maze of digressions, Tristram Shandy. In the final segment of the course, we’ll watch Jane Austen wield her cool, precise irony as a tool to dissect matters of rank and con-duct in Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, and Emma. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 385I  Envisioning Nature  (4 Credits)  
This course will examine the evolution of our modern understanding of the natural world. How do we imagine nature, and do other cultures (past and present) imagine it differently? Where exactly did our current understanding of the natural world come from, and where does it seem to be heading in the future? In asking these questions, we will also explore how different visions of nature (nature as God's creation, nature as a mechanical structure, nature as a complex ecosystem, human nature etc.) have shaped our approach to our understanding of the lives we live. Students will examine a mix of history, biology, political philosophy, literature, film and cultural theory texts as part of a course of study designed to investigate where, why and how writing and nature intersect in our world today. Course Objectives: 1. To explore the social and historical importance of influential visions of nature from the ancient world up to more recent modern and/or postmodern periods, 2. To investigate the relationship between nature, economics and literature, 3. To examine how certain visions of nature have been used to justify social inequalities, 4. To read debates about the natural world from politically informed perspectives and 5. To study how different visions of nature shape and reshape our understanding of the natural and social worlds in which we all live. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENVR 300D  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 385J  Medieval Women  (4 Credits)  
During the Middle Ages, commonplace depictions of women portrayed them as all-powerful temptresses or husband-destroying nags. Yet in reality women enjoyed little to no sexual freedom or legal authority in marriage. In this course, students examine the gap between these images and gendered realities as we study complex relationships between women and power in medieval literature. We look carefully at women as writers of and as subjects in medieval texts, reading for instance the romances of Marie de France and Chretien de Trois, the defense of women written by Christine de Pizan, and excerpts from Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. We read medieval women Christian mystics as well, Julian of Norwich among other, often surprisingly powerful, female visionaries. The course provides historical context for reading these figures, and specifically draws attention to the material conditions in which different genders were able to write. Students explore how gender affects one's ability to communicate in writing and to make his or her voice heard.
Prerequisites: You must take INTG 100 or 205 prior to taking ENGL 358J, a Thematic Focus Course. You must take a Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (CI) course prior to or at the same time as Thematic Focus Courses.   
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Focus - Truth  
ENGL 385K  Not Just a Song and Dance: Bollywood Cinema and Social Change in India  (4 Credits)  
This course will introduce students to Indian culture and society through a study of popular Indian cinema. The Indian film industry is the largest in the world and wields tremendous power as an economic and cultural force in the country. Focusing primarily on the “Bollywood” film industry based in Mumbai, we will examine how commercial cinema has influenced cultural attitudes and social change in India. The course will highlight how Bollywood films have addressed contentious topics like national identity, gender injustice, and globalization in contemporary India. While the course material (readings, films) will concentrate on Indian contexts, our discussions will, inevitably, tend towards a comparative understanding of the influence of cinema on social life. That is, students will draw on more familiar cinematic traditions (Hollywood, for instance) to achieve a more nuanced appreciation of how our social attitudes shape—and are shaped by—popular cinema.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE)  
ENGL 385L  American Environmental Literature  (4 Credits)  
This course explores the long history of American writing about nature and the environment, with particular attention to questions of the human place in nature. Some of this literate is about exploration—what is out there? Some of this is about the utility of nature—what can we do with vast forests, grasslands, or rivers? But the most interesting examples are often about what we can learn from nature and what obligations we may have to non-human life—what is our place in nature? The styles and traditions of American nature/ environmental writing have changed dramatically over time and today are quite diverse, incorporating at times elements of philosophy, theology, ethics, science, economics, politics, and art. Through reading, thinking, and discussing, and writing critically about a wide range of examples from genre students will gain an appreciation for the depth of the American literary approach to nature, become familiar with many of the writers and texts that could be said to form a “canon” in the field. And will learn to actively engage such writing form a variety of approaches including historical analysis, ecocriticism, and ethical reasoning.
Prerequisites: None  
Equivalent courses: ENGL 384, ENVR 315  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Encounter3 - Justice  
ENGL 386  Studies in Film  (4 Credits)  
This course analyzes film through one or more theoretical aspects. Psychoanalytical, feminist, cultural studies, and reader-response theories are among possible approaches offered. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. COMM 286 or ENGL 286 recommended.
Prerequisites: You must take INTG 100 or 205 prior to taking ENGL 386, a Thematic Focus Course. You must take a Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (CI) course prior to or at the same time as Thematic Focus Courses.   
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Equivalent courses: COMM 386  
Attributes: Human Experience (HE), Thematic Focus - Justice  
ENGL 387  Introduction to Linguistics  (4 Credits)  
Linguistics, as a discipline, is the scientific study of human language. This course will cover the core of linguistic study: phonetics and phonology (sounds and sound systems), morphology (word shapes), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (the meanings of linguistic forms), and pragmatics (meaning in context). We'll also look at a wide variety of other topics including sociolinguistics (language and identity), language contact, change, death, and revitalization; and writing systems. This challenging but fascinating topic area will prove relevant not only to students of English and education but also to those majoring in foreign languages, philosophy, psychology, or computer science. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
Attributes: Abstract Structures (AS)  
ENGL 388  Studies in Popular Culture  (4 Credits)  
Critical reading of such popular arts and practices as film, television, music, newspapers, etc. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Prerequisites: None  
Restrictions: Students with a class of First Year may not enroll.   
ENGL 397  Internship  (1-4 Credits)  
Integration of the skills of the English major, a liberal arts background and the expectations of a career. Individually tailored by the student with the advice and approval of a department advisor and the college's director of internships. S/U grading only.
Prerequisites: None  
Attributes: Experiential Engagement (EX)